(Source: Spotify)

The basics are that for every one female-speaking character in family-rated films (G, PG and PG-13), there are roughly three male characters; that crowd and group scenes in these films — live-action and animated — contain only 17 percent female characters; and that the ratio of male-female characters has been exactly the same since 1946. Throw in the hypersexualization of many of the female characters that are there, even in G-rated movies, and their lack of occupations and aspirations and you get the picture.

It wasn’t the lack of female lead characters that first struck me about family films. We all know that’s been the case for ages, and we love when movies like The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and Frozen hit it big. It was the dearth of female characters in the worlds of the stories — the fact that the fictitious villages and jungles and kingdoms and interplanetary civilizations were nearly bereft of female population — that hit me over the head. This being the case, we are in effect enculturating kids from the very beginning to see women and girls as not taking up half of the space. Couldn’t it be that the percentage of women in leadership positions in many areas of society — Congress, law partners, Fortune 500 board members, military officers, tenured professors and many more — stall out at around 17 percent because that’s the ratio we’ve come to see as the norm?

OK, now for the fun part: It’s easy, fast and fun to add female characters, in two simple steps. And I want to be clear I’m not talking about creating more movies with a female lead. If you do, God bless and thank you. Please consider me for that role.

Step 1: Go through the projects you’re already working on and change a bunch of the characters’ first names to women’s names. With one stroke you’ve created some colorful unstereotypical female characters that might turn out to be even more interesting now that they’ve had a gender switch. What if the plumber or pilot or construction foreman is a woman? What if the taxi driver or the scheming politician is a woman? What if both police officers that arrive on the scene are women — and it’s not a big deal?

Step 2: When describing a crowd scene, write in the script, “A crowd gathers, which is half female.” That may seem weird, but I promise you, somehow or other on the set that day the crowd will turn out to be 17 percent female otherwise. Maybe first ADs think women don’t gather, I don’t know.

And there you have it. You have just quickly and easily boosted the female presence in your project without changing a line of dialogue.

Yes, we can and will work to tell more women’s stories, listen to more women’s voices and write richer female characters and to fix the 5-to-1 ratio of men/women behind the camera. But consider this: In all of the sectors of society that still have a huge gender disparity, how long will it take to correct that? You can’t snap your fingers and suddenly half of Congress is women. But there’s one category where the underrepresentation of women can be fixed tomorrow: onscreen. In the time it takes to make a movie or create a television show, we can change what the future looks like.

There are woefully few women CEOs in the world, but there can be lots of them in films. We haven’t had a woman president yet, but we have on TV. (Full disclosure: One of them was me.) How can we fix the problem of corporate boards being so unequal without quotas? Well, they can be half women instantly, onscreen. How do we encourage a lot more girls to pursue science, technology and engineering careers? By casting droves of women in STEM jobs today in movies and on TV. Hey, it would take me many years to become a real nuclear physicist, but I can play one tomorrow.

Here’s what I always say: If they can see it, they can be it.

Geena Davis on gender equality in film and television [x] (via wesleywalesandersons)

(via aleskot)

nevver:

How is your day going? Isaac Cordal

(via nevver)

I don’t understand why sex is more shocking than violence.
Lea Seydoux talking about American films  (via maddynorris)

(Source: tvshows-who-knows, via qbashp)

God I hope they don’t ruin this with a states side remake 

God I hope they don’t ruin this with a states side remake 

(Source: bbodysnatchers, via bbodysnatchers)

Advice from Adventure Time (2/??)

(Source: mediterranean-nudes, via nightsinthecinema)


Cover art for the first Saga hardcover collection

Cover art for the first Saga hardcover collection

(Source: fyeahsaga)

(Source: emmawathson, via dailypotter)

gingerrogerss:

Gal Gadot's Wonder Woman in Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016)

UGH God damn it she doesn’t have any god damn muscles and looks like a god damn skinny fucking god damn model. WAY TO FUCK UP AGAIN DC. Fuck sake. God damn it fuck. 

gingerrogerss:

Gal Gadot's Wonder Woman in Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016)

UGH God damn it she doesn’t have any god damn muscles and looks like a god damn skinny fucking god damn model. WAY TO FUCK UP AGAIN DC. Fuck sake. God damn it fuck. 

(via emclainable)

Brian K. Vaughn And Fiona Staples Reveal What's Ahead For Saga

OH MY GOSH GUYS Brian K. Vaughn’s critique behind Slave Leia from Star Wars and reasoning behind his inception of Slave Girl in Saga is so amazing! 

I really hope that these posters are actual one sheets that will be used to promote the films out side of comic-con because they’re fucking bad ass. 

(>__<)

  • Comic Con: knock knock
  • Me: who's there
  • Comic Con: not you lol
cinephiliabeyond:

Dear every filmmaker, read this: an utterly brilliant series of articles by Film School Rejects’ Scott Beggs called 6 Filmmaking Tips From…
Martin Scorsese
Alfred Hitchcock
David Fincher
Stanley Kubrick
Billy Wilder
Steven Spielberg
The Coen Brothers
Wes Anderson
Ridley Scott
David Cronenberg
Pixar
Nora Ephron
Aaron Sorkin
Michael Haneke
Christopher Nolan
Jon Jost
John Ford
Charlie Kaufman
Sylvester Stallone
Tony Scott
Frank Darabont
Monty Python
Werner Herzog
Paul Thomas Anderson

Joss Whedon
Rian Johnson
Wes Craven
John Carpenter
Dario Argento
The Wachowskis
Steven Soderbergh
George Lucas
Peter Jackson
Kathryn Bigelow
Quentin Tarantino
Sundance Directors
Harold Lloyd
John McTiernan
Oscar Winning Directors
Ang Lee
Danny Boyle
Harmony Korine
Dennis Hopper
Sam Raimi
Shane Black
Richard Linklater
Alejandro Jodorowsky
Guillermo del Toro
Sam Peckinpah
Akira Kurosawa

Edgar Wright
Wong Kar-Wai
Robert Altman
James Wan
Errol Morris
Ron Howard
Yasujirō Ozu
Kimberly Peirce
Steve McQueen
Andy Warhol
Roger Deakins
David O. Russell
James Gray
Terry Gilliam
Andy Serkis
Rick Baker
Alain Resnais
William Friedkin
Saul Zaentz
Woody Allen’s Manhattan
Abbas Kiarostami
Darren Aronofsky
Lars von Trier
Hayao Miyazaki
Federico Fellini
Sarah Polley
Tommy Wiseau
Brian Koppelman
Spike Lee

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia &amp; Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia &amp; Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia &amp; Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

Dear every filmmaker, read this: an utterly brilliant series of articles by Film School Rejects’ Scott Beggs called 6 Filmmaking Tips From…

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

dontforgetish:

Fugazi

I’m So Tired